If you want to become a chess champion, you will have to learn a lot about chess in general, more about chess openings. You’ll also need to practice every day.

1. LEARN HOW TO MOVE

Each chess piece can only move in one direction. A pawn, for example, advances straight ahead but can only attack one square at a time. The movement of a knight is L-shaped. The bishop can travel more than one square at a time and moves at an angle. The rook (castle) can only move in one direction: forward, backward, or to the side. The most powerful piece, the queen, can move in any direction for any number of squares, but not in both directions at the same time. And the king goes at a sedate pace, one square at a time in any direction, as a king should.

2. USE A PAWN TO OPEN

Move the pawn two squares forward in front of the king or queen. (A pawn can only move two squares on its first move.) This allows your bishops and queen to enter the game more easily. If pawns are in the path, they move at an angle and can’t get out onto the battlefield.

3. REMOVE THE BISHOPS AND KNIGHTS

Move your knights and bishops to the center of the board before moving your queen, rooks, or king. To attack, you need to get these pieces out from behind the pawns.

4. BE AWARE OF YOUR BACKGROUND!

Also, the front! “What did my opponent’s last move do?” always come to mind when it’s your turn. “What is he up to?” you might wonder. Is he setting traps for you to fall into? Then make your own decision. Always consider all of your options. Consider plays that would first capture your opponent’s troops or put his king in jeopardy. However, you should always double-check your moves before executing them. “Does my move leave anything unprotected?” ask yourself.

5. TAKE ACTION IMMEDIATELY IF YOU DON’T WANT TO WASTE TIME

Make a limited number of movements with your pawns and avoid picking out your opponent’s pawns.

6. EARLY “CASTLE”

Castling allows you to move your king to safety while simultaneously bringing your rook into play. When all of the squares between the rook and the king are empty, you can move the king two squares nearer the rook, while the rook goes to the square on the king’s opposite side. You could be able to assault your opponent’s king if your opponent fails to castle. This is the only move that allows you to move more than one piece in a single turn.

7. ATTACK IN THE MIDDLE OF THE GAME

The middlegame occurs after you’ve moved all of your knights and bishops into the game and castled (these actions are known as your “opening”). Always be on the lookout for methods to capture your opponent’s men in the middlegame. Take any piece that isn’t being protected by your opponent. But consider what would happen to your piece if you accept his – will you be targeted? Always be on the lookout for ways to get a large number of your soldiers into position to assault the opposing king.

8. WISELY LOSE PIECES

Some of your opponent’s pieces will be taken by you. A portion of your work will be taken. You must determine what constitutes a good swap and what does not. If you’re going to lose one of them, use these points to determine whether you’re making a smart decision:

9 points for the queen
5 points for the rook
3 points for Bishop
3 points for the knight
1 point for the pawn
Is it wise to sacrifice a bishop in order to rescue a pawn? No!

9. DON’T PLAY TOO QUICKLY

Sit on your hands if you notice a good move and search for a better one. Chess success requires patient thought.

10. SUCCESS IN THE FINAL GAME

The endgame begins once you and your opponent have swapped pieces and are down to only a few men. The importance of the pawns has increased. A pawn becomes a queen if it can advance to the farthest row away from you. It was a huge success! Allow your king to attack as long as he stays out of the way of your opponent’s remaining pieces, particularly the queen, and does not allow himself to be checked.

When your opponent threatens to capture the king with one of his pieces on his next move, your king is said to be in check. The game is lost if your king is checked and you have no way of removing the threat – it can’t flee away, you can’t capture the opposing piece that has him checked, and you can’t block the check by moving one of your own pieces. Checkmate! You win if you checkmate your opponent before he checkmates you!

 

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